Repairing vs Buying New

With entry-level PCs selling for less than $500 and fully equipped mainstream PCs selling for $1,200, you might wonder if it’s even worthwhile to repair or upgrade your old system. After all, a new system comes with a warranty, all new software, and shiny new parts. The problem is and I’ll try to put this politely, a cheap new system is just that. Cheap! Year after year, consumer-grade, mass-market PCs are cost-reduced more and more. That shiny new cheap system comes with a cheap, unreliable motherboard; a small, slow hard drive; barely adequate memory; a marginal power supply, and filled with tons of 3rd party Trial software that slows your “NEW” system down even more. Is it impossible, then, to buy a good system, manufactured with high-quality components? Of course not, but don’t expect to get it at a bargain price. Business-grade systems from name-brand vendors and systems targeted at gamers and other enthusiasts use high-quality components, but those systems are priced 50% to 200% higher than consumer-grade, mass-market systems. If you compare apples to apples, you’ll often find that it’s cheaper overall to repair or upgrade your current system than to buy an equivalent new system.

There is also a growing concern among many people about the millions of PCs that are discarded every year. By repairing or upgrading your current system to extend its life, you minimize the burden on the environment. If you are unsure on how to proceed with your system, I can help you make that determination with an In home or in shop diagnosis.  Repair? or Replace?